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Joe Dante, Director, Producer, Editor, Actor – I Blame Dennis Hopper on Popcorn Talk

“I Blame Dennis Hopper” is film aficionado and historian Illeana Douglas’ vodcast featuring exclusive interviews, discussion, and topical commentary from one of the industry’s most respected artists.

On today’s episode of “I Blame Dennis Hopper”, Joe Dante sits down with Illeana.

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Trumbo | Anatomy of a Movie

AOM hosts Marisa Serafini (@SerafiniTV), Sara Stretton (@Sara_Stretton), Tamara Berg (@TamaraBerg), & John Comerford discuss the 2015 movie Trumbo. Trumbo is a 2015 American biographical drama film directed by Jay Roach and written by John McNamara. The film stars Bryan Cranston, Diane Lane, Louis C.K., Elle Fanning, John Goodman, Michael Stuhlbarg and Helen Mirren. The film follows the life of Hollywood screenwriter Dalton Trumbo and is based on the biography Dalton Trumbo by Bruce Alexander Cook. The film was shown in the Special Presentations section of the 2015 Toronto International Film Festival, and was released on November 6, 2015, by Bleecker Street.    

Marilyn Monroe Discussion pt. 2 – Historic Hollywood (November 8th, 2015)

Historic Hollywood hosts Lex Michael, Karie Bible, and Byron Thompson do an an in depth discovery of the masters of film who built Hollywood. In depth biography and filmography of the cinematic masters of the past. Today we’re talking about Marilyn Monroe. Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson, June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was an American actress and model. Famous for playing “dumb blonde” characters, she became one of the most popular sex symbols of the 1950s, emblematic of the era’s attitudes towards sexuality. Although she was a top-billed actress for only a decade, her films grossed $200 million by the time of her unexpected death in 1962.[1] She continues to be considered a major popular culture icon. Born and raised in Los Angeles, Monroe spent most of her childhood in foster homes and an orphanage and married for the first time at the age of sixteen. While working in a factory as part of the war effort in 1944, she met a photographer and began a successful pin-up modeling career. The work led to two short-lived film contracts with Twentieth Century-Fox(1946–1947) and Columbia Pictures (1948). After a series of minor film roles, she signed a new contract with Fox in 1951. She quickly became a popular actress with roles in several comedies, including As Young as You Feel (1951) and Monkey Business (1952), and in the dramas Clash by Night (1952) and Don’t Bother to Knock (1952). Monroe faced a scandal when it was revealed that she had posed for nude photos before becoming a star, but rather than damaging her career the story increased interest in her films. By 1953, Monroe was one of the most bankable Hollywood stars with leading roles in three films: the noir Niagara, which focused on her sex appeal, and the comedies Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and How to Marry a Millionaire, which established her star image as a “dumb blonde”. Although she played a significant role in the creation and management of her public image throughout her career, she was disappointed at being typecast and underpaid by the studio. She was briefly suspended in early 1954 for refusing a film project, but returned to star in one of the biggest box office successes of her career, The Seven Year Itch (1955). When the studio was still reluctant to change her contract, Monroe founded a film production company in 1954, Marilyn Monroe Productions (MMP). While building her company she began studying method acting at the Actors Studio; in late-1955, Fox granted her more control and a larger salary. After giving a critically acclaimed performance in Bus Stop (1956) and acting in the first independent production of MMP, The Prince and the Showgirl (1957), she won a Best Actress Golden Globe for Some Like It Hot (1959). Her last completed film was the drama The Misfits(1961). Monroe’s troubled private life received much attention. She struggled with addiction, depression, and anxiety. She had two highly publicized marriages, to baseball player Joe DiMaggio and playwright Arthur Miller, which both ended in divorce. She died at the age of 36 from an overdose of barbiturates at her home on August 5, 1962. Although the death was ruled a probable suicide, several conspiracy theories have been proposed in the decades following her death.

Dominic Flores discusses Our Brand Is Crisis on iTalk Movies

iTalk movies is a long-form interview series featuring leading members of the film community. In this episode, host Fern Ronay interviews Dominic Flores from Our Brand Is Crisis in studio on the Popcorn Talk Network. Dominic Flores is a film and television actor from Dana Point California. Born and raised in the beach cities of Southern California, Dominic’s mother was a school teacher and his father was a famous Latin trumpet player from Bolivia in South America. Dominic toured and played a Latin hip hop fusion with his father until 1996 when he began training to be a professional actor at the prestigious South Coast Repertory theater in Costa Mesa. After being cast on both their main stage and second stage productions he moved to Los Angeles and was cast on his first audition in the film “Starmaps” the debut feature from Miguel Arteta which went on to much success at the Sundance film festival where it was purchased and theatrically released from Fox Searchlight in 1997. Dominic did not return to acting until 2007 and he steadily began working in small parts on hit network TV shows like, House, Sons of Anarchy,My Name is Earl, and New Girl as well as roles in the films Peep World, My Name is Khan, and Rampart with Woody Harrelson and directed by Oren Moverman. in 2014 Dominic was cast in his first starring role in a studio film playing the corrupt politician Hugo Barco opposite Sandra Bullock in her new film “Our Brand is Crisis”. Produced by George Clooney and his Smokehouse productions and released by Warner Brothers in 2015 OBIC tells the true story of American politicians hired to elect an undesired candidate in Bolivia and the consequences of their actions. David Gordon Green directs and Billy Bob Thornton, Zoe Kazan, and Anthony Mackie costar. Dominic is married to the producer Kristen Ridgway Flores and they have three children together. in 2014 Dominic and Kristen produced the documentary “My Uncle is the Green River Killer” for the A&E/LMN network. Dominic and Kristen are the founders of the Feel Good Film Festival, a 3 day non profit film festival in Hollywood designed to showcase films that make you feel better than you did before you sat down. It debuted at the Egyptian theater to much success in 2008 and continued until 2012. @ThePopcornTalk

Marilyn Monroe Discussion – Pt. 1 | Historic Hollywood

Historic Hollywood hosts Lex Michael, Karie Bible, and Byron Thompson do an an in depth discovery of the masters of film who built Hollywood. In depth biography and filmography of the cinematic masters of the past. Today we’re talking about Marilyn Monroe. Marilyn Monroe (born Norma Jeane Mortenson, June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962), was an American actress and model. Famous for playing “dumb blonde” characters, she became one of the most popular sex symbols of the 1950s, emblematic of the era’s attitudes towards sexuality. Although she was a top-billed actress for only a decade, her films grossed $200 million by the time of her unexpected death in 1962.[1] She continues to be considered a major popular culture icon. Born and raised in Los Angeles, Monroe spent most of her childhood in foster homes and an orphanage and married for the first time at the age of sixteen. While working in a factory as part of the war effort in 1944, she met a photographer and began a successful pin-up modeling career. The work led to two short-lived film contracts with Twentieth Century-Fox(1946–1947) and Columbia Pictures (1948). After a series of minor film roles, she signed a new contract with Fox in 1951. She quickly became a popular actress with roles in several comedies, including As Young as You Feel (1951) and Monkey Business (1952), and in the dramas Clash by Night (1952) and Don’t Bother to Knock (1952). Monroe faced a scandal when it was revealed that she had posed for nude photos before becoming a star, but rather than damaging her career the story increased interest in her films. By 1953, Monroe was one of the most bankable Hollywood stars with leading roles in three films: the noir Niagara, which focused on her sex appeal, and the comedies Gentlemen Prefer Blondes and How to Marry a Millionaire, which established her star image as a “dumb blonde”. Although she played a significant role in the creation and management of her public image throughout her career, she was disappointed at being typecast and underpaid by the studio. She was briefly suspended in early 1954 for refusing a film project, but returned to star in one of the biggest box office successes of her career, The Seven Year Itch (1955). When the studio was still reluctant to change her contract, Monroe founded a film production company in 1954, Marilyn Monroe Productions (MMP). While building her company she began studying method acting at the Actors Studio; in late-1955, Fox granted her more control and a larger salary. After giving a critically acclaimed performance in Bus Stop (1956) and acting in the first independent production of MMP, The Prince and the Showgirl (1957), she won a Best Actress Golden Globe for Some Like It Hot (1959). Her last completed film was the drama The Misfits(1961). Monroe’s troubled private life received much attention. She struggled with addiction, depression, and anxiety. She had two highly publicized marriages, to baseball player Joe DiMaggio and playwright Arthur Miller, which both ended in divorce. She died at the age of 36 from an overdose of barbiturates at her home on August 5, 1962. Although the death was ruled a probable suicide, several conspiracy theories have been proposed in the decades following her death.

Robert Zemeckis Profile – Episode #41 (October 13th, 2015)

Popcorn Talk proudly presents Profiles with Malone and Mantz! In this vodcast series hosts Alicia Malone and Scott “Movie” Mantz break down and focus on some of the most prolific Hollywood directors, writers and actors in the entertainment industry – past & present. Today it’s all about Robert Zemeckis… So who else to discuss him than with Lea Thompson and Christopher Lloyd! “Forrest Gump” is available to rent or buy on iTunes: http://j.mp/GetForrestGump Robert Lee Zemeckis (born May 14, 1952) is an American filmmaker and screenwriter. Zemeckis is credited as one of the greatest “visual storytellers” in filmmaking and is a pioneer of visual effects. He has directed some of the biggest blockbuster hits of the past few decades. He first came to public attention in the 1980s as the director and co-creator of the science-fiction comedy Back to the Future film trilogy, as well as the live-action/animated family comedy Who Framed Roger Rabbit (1988), though in the 1990s he diversified into more dramatic fare, including 1994’s Forrest Gump, for which he won an Academy Award for Best Directing. The films he has directed have ranged across a wide variety of genres, for both adults and families. His films are characterized by an interest in state-of-the-art special effects, including the early use of the insertion of computer graphics into live-action footage in Back to the Future Part II (1989) and the pioneering performance capturetechniques seen in The Polar Express (2004), Beowulf (2007) and A Christmas Carol (2009). Though Zemeckis has often been pigeonholed as a director interested only in effects, his work has been defended by several critics, including David Thomson, who wrote that “No other contemporary director has used special effects to more dramatic and narrative purpose.” Follow Alicia on Twitter! Follow Scott on Twitter! SUBSCRIBE TO PROFILES ON ITUNES!