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Star Wars Episode 6: Return of the Jedi | Watchalong!

Sync up your Blurays and join Jedi Alliance hosts Joseph Scrimshaw and Mark Donica in watching Star Wars Episode 6: Return of the Jedi! Return of the Jedi (also known as Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi) is a 1983 American epic space opera film directed by Richard Marquand. The screenplay by Lawrence Kasdan and George Lucas was from a story by Lucas, who was also the executive producer. It was the third film released in the Star Wars saga and the first film to use THX technology. The film is set one year after The Empire Strikes Back and was produced by Howard Kazanjian for Lucasfilm Ltd. The film stars Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford, Carrie Fisher, Billy Dee Williams, Anthony Daniels, David Prowse, Kenny BakerPeter Mayhew and Frank Oz. The evil Galactic Empire, under the direction of the ruthless Emperor Palpatine, is constructing a second Death Star in order to crush the Rebel Alliance once and for all. Since Palpatine plans to personally oversee the final stages of its construction, the Rebel Fleet launches a full-scale attack on the Death Star in order to prevent its completion and kill Palpatine, effectively bringing an end to the Empire’s hold over the galaxy. Meanwhile, Luke Skywalker, the Rebel leader and Jedi apprentice, struggles to bring Darth Vader, whom he has learned is actually his father Anakin and himself a fallen Jedi, back from the Dark Side of the Force. David Lynch and David Cronenberg were considered to direct the project before Marquand signed on as director. The production team relied on Lucas’ storyboards during pre-production. While writing the shooting script, Lucas, Kasdan, Marquand, and producer Howard Kazanjian spent two weeks in conference discussing ideas to construct it. Kazanjian’s schedule pushed shooting to begin a few weeks early to allow Industrial Light & Magic more time to work on the film’s effects in post-production. Filming took place in England, California, and Arizona from January to March 1982. Strict secrecy surrounded the production and the film used the working title Blue Harvest to prevent price gouging. Download, Rate and Review the Audio Version on iTunes! https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/watchalong!/id1050050922?mt=2

V For Vendetta | Watchalong!

Popcorn Talk Personalities sit in for a WatchAlong with V For Vendetta! Join Steve Kaufmann, Alan Kistler, and Bill Posley for commentary on today’s movie! Download, Rate and Review the Audio Version on iTunes! https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/watchalong!/id1050050922?mt=2 V for Vendetta is a 2006 political thriller film directed by James McTeigue and written by the Wachowski Brothers, based on the 1988 Vertigo graphic novel of the same name by Alan Moore and David Lloyd. Hugo Weaving portrays V, an anarchist freedom fighter who attempts to ignite a revolution against the brutal neo-fascist regime that has subjugated thedystopian United Kingdom and exterminated its opponents in concentration camps. Natalie Portman plays Evey, a working-class girl caught up in V’s mission, and Stephen Rea portrays the detective leading a desperate quest to stop V. The film was originally scheduled for release by Warner Bros. on Friday, November 4, 2005 (a day before the 400th Guy Fawkes Night), but was delayed; it opened on March 17, 2006, to positive reviews. Alan Moore, having been dissatisfied with the film adaptations of his graphic novels From Hell (2001) and The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (2003), declined to watch the film and asked not to be credited. V for Vendetta has been seen by many political groups as an allegory of oppression by government; libertarians andanarchists have used it to promote their beliefs. David Lloyd stated: “The Guy Fawkes mask has now become a common brand and a convenient placard to use in protest against tyranny – and I’m happy with people using it, it seems quite unique, an icon of popular culture being used this way.”

The Matrix (Keanu Reeves) Review | Action Movie Anatomy

Action Movie Anatomy hosts Ben Bateman and Andrew Ghai break down The Matrix! The Matrix is a 1999 American science fiction action film written and directed by The Wachowskis, starring Keanu Reeves, Laurence Fishburne, Carrie-Anne Moss, Hugo Weaving, and Joe Pantoliano. It depicts a dystopian future in which reality as perceived by most humans is actually a simulated reality called “the Matrix”, created by sentient machines to subdue the human population, while their bodies’ heat and electrical activity are used as an energy source. Computer programmer “Neo” learns this truth and is drawn into a rebellion against the machines, which involves other people who have been freed from the “dream world”. The Matrix is known for popularizing a visual effect known as “bullet time“, (an optical effect that had its origins in the filmKill and Kill Again) in which the heightened perception of certain characters is represented by allowing the action within ashot to progress in slow-motion while the camera’s viewpoint appears to move through the scene at normal speed. The film is an example of the cyberpunk science fiction genre.[5] It contains numerous references to philosophical and religious ideas, and prominently pays homage to works such as Plato‘s Allegory of the Cave,[6] Jean Baudrillard‘sSimulacra and Simulation[7] and Lewis Carroll‘s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.[8] The Wachowskis’ approach to action scenes drew upon their admiration for Japanese animation[9] and martial arts films, and the film’s use of fight choreographers and wire fu techniques from Hong Kong action cinema was influential upon subsequent Hollywood action film productions.

Terminator 2 (Arnold Schwarzeneggar) Review | Action Movie Anatomy

Action Movie Anatomy hosts Ben Bateman and Andrew Ghai break down Terminator 2 getting ready for the Terminator Genisys premiere! Theme song by NikoMakaris.com Terminator 2: Judgment Day (also referred to as simply Terminator 2 or T2) is a 1991 American science fiction actionfilm co-written, produced and directed by James Cameron. The film stars Arnold Schwarzenegger, Linda Hamilton, Robert Patrick and Edward Furlong. It is the second installment of the Terminator franchise and the sequel to the 1984 film The Terminator. Terminator 2 follows Sarah Connor (Hamilton) and her ten-year-old son John (Furlong) as they are pursued by a new, more advanced Terminator, the liquid metal, shapeshifting T-1000 (Patrick), sent back in time to kill John Connor and prevent him from becoming the leader of the human resistance. A second, less advanced Terminator (Schwarzenegger) is also sent back in time to protect John. After a troubled pre-production characterized by legal disputes, Mario Kassar of Carolco Pictures emerged with the franchise’s property rights in early 1990. This paved the way for the completion of the screenplay by a Cameron-led production team, and the October 1990 start of a shortened 186-day filming schedule. The production of Terminator 2required an unprecedented budget of more than $94 million, much of which was spent on filming and special effects. The film was released on July 3, 1991, in time for the U.S. Fourth of July weekend. The film’s visual effects saw breakthroughs in computer-generated imagery, including the first use of natural human motionfor a computer-generated character and the first partially computer-generated main character.[4] Terminator 2 was a box office and critical success and influenced popular culture, especially the use of visual effects in films.[5] It received many accolades, including four Academy Awards for Best Sound Editing, Best Sound Mixing, Best Makeup, and Best Visual Effects.[6] The highest-grossing film of 1991, Terminator 2 has since been ranked by several publications such as theAmerican Film Institute as one of the greatest action films, science fiction films and sequels of all time.